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Landscapes

         

 

    

 

                   

 

Horses

    

 

                   

 

                   

 

                   

 

Other subjects

                  

                   

 

                   

 

Night scenes

              

 

         

 

              

 

         

 

 

    

 

    

 

                        

 

              

 

                        

 

                        

 

                   

 

                   

 

             

 

              

 

Other technics on wood

                   

              

 

                   

 

Photolithography

              

 

Photolithography, numbered and signed limited edition.

 

Size 10 x 8 in. (25 x 20 cm)    20 $

 

Prices are in canadian currency and do not include framing or shipping costs.

 

In  Museum

Ephemeris work

In 2009, in a competition on the occasion of the 400th anniversary celebrations marking the passing of Samuel de Champlain in the region, the City of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, Canada invited three artists to produce a model 12in. X 48in. describing the event. The work of the recipient will be reproduced on a of 7 feet. X 32ft, wall scene of a residence adjacent to the Park Public Place du Vieux-Saint-Jean - Rue Richelieu, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, Canada.

After several hours of research, reading the writings of historians and Nicole Martin Verenka,  Réal Fortin and to discover and photographs can provide some benchmarks, the artist has not skimp on any details.

The work is composed of two distinct parts connected by a wampum. The left section of the work shows Samuel de Champlain surrounded by French and Indians sitting on the banks of the Richelieu River. We see wild animals and pines, recalling the writings of the famous explorer who stated they had never seen such beautiful trees at the site of Fort Sainte-Thérèse. The other part of the picture is the bridge between the present and the past. Compass in hand, to whom we owe the founding of Quebec City looks to the future. On the banks of the Richelieu River, you can see some of the buildings that shape the landscape today as the other side of the character, the Indians heading toward the Lake Champlain to battle the Iroquois are distinguished.

The artist's work has not been retained by the City of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and the Musée du Fort Saint-Jean became the owner so that the public can learn more about the history through art. It is interesting to know that the work is now part of the huge collection of Her Majesty the Queen of England.

 


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